This site was an amazing find for us and a place I had really been looking forward to explore. I had known about the mine for some time and, as is the usual case lately, and I just needed the time and some people to come with me underground. I was able to talk Bill and Dan into a side trip scouting the area at the end of another long trip in Nevada. Since it was the end of the trip, we didn’t have enough time to explore the whole mine but it looked promising. We also looked at a few other nearby sites on our list that were too close to pass up. I tried to put a return trip together but it took a few months before I could get the guys to come back with me for a full exploration of the mine. I’m glad we did.

The mine itself is an old one. The district was first developed in the 1880s for gold, silver, and copper but substantial production didn’t start until the early 1900s. The mine produced mostly copper and the ore was hauled to the nearest railhead. Ore was originally shipped to smelters in Utah and later to a smelter in Nevada. The mine is laid out on seven different levels that are split into two sections. Four levels along the main shaft and three in the other section. This doesn’t include a nearby mine in the same group which has a few more levels. None of the sections are connected underground, but even so, the main part of the mine is a few thousand feet of well-timbered workings and very interesting to explore.

"Bernanke" Mine
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