About Guy

Guy Starbuck

I started this website, Starbuck.org, way back in the dark ages of the internet (aka 1997) to track my hiking and peak-bagging adventures. I’d always preferred to hike to the more remote and seldom-visited peaks. Along the way, I passed countless historical mines and prehistoric rock art sites. Over time, I noticed they were being vandalized. History was disappearing. I decided to document what sites I could. 

This website only shows a fraction of the places that I’ve been to. My photo collection contains over 64,000 photos, of which more than 14,000 are here on this site.

And although I can’t reveal the locations of all the places I visit; I hope to share some them of them here with you.

Theft and vandalism decrease when people care about places. You can’t care about something you don’t know about.

It takes a lot to run this site. Please consider supporting it. I appreciate it.

Please respect and enjoy.

–Guy


“Two roads diverged in a wood, and I —

I took the one less traveled by,

And that has made all the difference.”

Robert Frost


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You can also sign up to get an email whenever I post a new trip to this site. I won’t give out your email to anyone.


Merch

I have a tiny little store.


Published Works

Articles:

“Searching for Petroglyphs in the Cottonwoods”, Panamint Breeze. June 2011.

Photos published in:

Charles Warren Center for Studies in American History. Flyer. 2013.

Ecology Letters. “Applying trait-based models to achieve functional targets for theory-driven ecological restoration” by Daniel Laughlin. 2014.

“Religious Symbolism in Eastern California Ghost Dance Rock Paintings” by Alan Gold. 2014.

“A Picture is Worth a Thousand Words”, Friends of the Public Land Cabins. 2015.

“Historical Sites in Joshua Tree Closed Due to Theft of Artifacts” by David Halligan, The Survivor, Fall 2016.

“Ancient Universal Language of Man” by Chris Hegg. 2015. 

TRACCE Rock Art Bulletin by Maarten van Hoek. 2015 & 2018.

“Tybo, Nevada” by Robert McCracken and Jeanne Sharp Howerton. 2016.

“The Cosmological Connections to Rock Art in the Great Basin and California”. Western Carolina University. by Samantha Clark, Clara Ennis, Brittany Hormel, and Kaley Kelly. Poster. 2019.


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Last Updated on February 9, 2021 by Guy Starbuck