Swasey’s Cabin

Swasey’s cabin was built in 1921 by the well-known Swasey brothers as a line cabin. They would stay out here to watch over their cattle. Out behind the cabin, in one of the canyons, they had an icebox setup where they would store meats and any other foodstuffs. I’m not entirely sure which canyon it was though.

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Lava River Cave

Back in late spring of this year, we took a trip out to Flagstaff seeking some cooler temperatures. One of the places we stopped at was the Lava River Cave.

Formed in the Pleistocene, roughly 675,000 years ago, this 0.75 mile long lava tube is remarkable not only for its length but also its tall ceilings; at some points the roof it more than 30′ above your head. That is a bit unusual in my experience.

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Clamshell Petroglyphs

The Clamshell petroglyphs are an easy to reach Anasazi site just outside of Fredonia, Arizona. These petroglyphs and pictographs are so old they are hard to see at all. There are some interesting designs though; including some anthropomorphic figures, a water glyph, a six toed footprint and spirals. Lots of spirals. Obviously, an important symbol here.

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Angel Canyon Ruin

A couple of months ago, we took a quick trip to Utah. One of the places we visited was a small set of Anasazi ruins in two alcoves near Angel Canyon. It was an interesting hike to get out there. Some bushwhacking was involved.

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Silent Sentinel Petroglyphs

Late in the spring of 2011, we were off exploring in the backcountry of Utah’s San Rafael Swell. We spent a week or so off paved roads and camping out. One of the spots we stopped at was the Silent Sentinel.

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Copper Globe Mine

The Copper Globe never really had much production but was worked in a minor way for many years, starting in 1906 and going through to WWII. This is some remote country. It was interesting to see that most of the entrances to the workings have filled in from wind blown sand.
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Black Dragon Pictographs

This site is set a little ways back inside of an impressively deep canyon. The site got its name because one of the main pictograph designs resembles a dragon or pterodactyl. Researchers have discovered however that group of pictographs are a collection of five separate images overlapping with each other: One is a bug-eyed person (found in Barrier Canyon sites), the others are of a sheep, a dog and a snake-like creatures.  Nearby, and under a large overhang is a whole wall of Fremont style pictographs. Some symbols look like corn, but there are many counting marks, hand prints, tracks and figures. The site has a mix of pictographs from the Fremont and Barrier Canyon styles. They were around until 1300 AD.

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