Starbuck's Exploring

Hiking and exploring backcountry locations of the Western United States.

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John’s Wash Arborglyphs

Most of the historical relics I find on my hikes are from the booming mining industries of the early 1900s which dominated the Nevada landscape but there were other activities going on at the time. Ranching was just as important as mining to the early settlers and sheepherding was a part of that effort. Basque sheepherders from the Pyrenees mountains between France and Spain came to Nevada during this time and found good pasture.
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Maintenance

I’ve been doing some long term maintenance on Starbuck.org. As a result, some trip reports were removed and others have had the order of their photos  mixed up.

I’m working on this but it will take some time. I don’t quite seem to have the time I used to put into the site. More trip reports are coming though.

Silver Lake and Iowa Mines

This was a really fun place to visit for me and one I’ve been trying to get to for some time. Weather makes it hard to get to most of the year and you have to climb up to the mine camp at 12,200 ft elevation.
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Recent News

And….  we’re back.  After taking a summer hiatus, we are back to posting. I’m fifty trips behind? A hundred? Oh I forget. (Actually, it’s more). Alright, I will try to post a few a month.
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Mayflower Mill

The Mayflower Mill is one of the last fully intact mills in the Silverton, Colorado area. Also known as the Shenandoah-Dives Mill, it was the most advanced flotation mill for its time.
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Buffalo Boy Mine

The Buffalo Boy was a small gold and silver mine which started production around 1930. The mine is caved but the interesting thing about the site is the long and steep tramway heading up to it. The tram line is over 8,500′ in length and rises 2,500′ up cliffs to reach the mine at 12,550′ in elevation.
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Hand Painted Pueblo

These are the remains of a small pueblo village site inside Hovenweep National Monument and surrounded by the Canyons of the Ancients National Monument.

The pueblo was probably built in the 1200s by Ancestral Puebloans (Anazasi).  This tower is along the side of a canyon and completely below the rim.  We couldn’t see it until we were close.  It is an interesting and special place.
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Cutthroat Castle

The Cutthroat Castle pueblo was built around the same time as the other Hovenweep puebloan ruins.  Although the pueblo itself looks small, there would have been many people living around it in the area.  The site is along a canyon and is unusual in that it had a kiva built on top of a boulder and not underground.  Perhaps the terrain of the site simply wouldn’t have allowed it. The site is way out in the middle of nowhere but worth the journey.
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Underground near Silverton

These are underground photos from a mine in the Silverton area that we explored. I actually didn’t have much underground time planned for this trip, but the mines we did check out turned out to be fantastic.
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San Juan Chief Mill

This scenic ruined mill site was built in the late 1890s and never saw ore from its namesake, the San Juan Chief mine. It is the second mill to be built on this site. In 1900, it had 2 roasting furnaces and 15 stamps.
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