Victory Mine

Boxcar lights up the stope.

Boxy and I recently re-visited this interesting little tungsten mine out in central Nevada. I first visited this mine in 2002.

It was originally discovered in 1945 by W. L. Sovy, Jack Southerland, and Albert Brown. In 1949, it was purchased by J. S. Dougan and associates, who formed the Gabbs Exploration Company. They built a mill in 1952 and it produced over 100,000 tons of tungsten ore until it went idle in 1963. It was quite an operation at the time.
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Ames Camp

We found this little cabin.

Roy Ames located some fluorspar claims in the hills above this little camp in 1941 but it doesn’t appear that he produced much if any fluorite. I suspect some of the buildings were already here by that time but he probably improved them. Roy passed away in 1966 and is buried in Tonopah.
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Kay Cooper Mine

We visited the mine in Sept 2017. Nice to see the shaft headframe still standing.

Located in 1946, this tungsten mine is a fairly recent discovery. In 1949-50, the mine was worked by Carl Cooper and R. C. Peterson of nearby Gabbs. It was later worked by a Ray Ricketts.
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John’s Wash Arborglyphs

Forest meadow.

Most of the historical relics I find on my hikes are from the booming mining industries of the early 1900s which dominated the Nevada landscape but there were other activities going on at the time. Ranching was just as important as mining to the early settlers and sheepherding was a part of that effort. Basque sheepherders from the Pyrenees mountains between France and Spain came to Nevada during this time and found good pasture.
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“Catalonia” Mine

This cabin was the main residence.

Not too long ago (in the late summer of 2015, to be exact), we drove to this little abandoned mining camp in the backcountry of Nevada. As we got closer, we discovered the old road was completely overgrown and lost in the willows.  So we got out of our trucks and hiked in. I was interested to see if anything remained of the old mill that once served the mine.
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Bald Mountain Wash Petroglyphs

Cowboy signatures.

Brownie Sam and Emmett Rosse, two Shoshone cowboys, stopped alongside this huge volcanic boulder in late October of 1932. It is a place where their ancestors had camped many times. The ancients had carved numerous symbols on this rock, they decided they would too. They stood on the backs of their horses and added their names to the record above the petroglyphs below.
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“Titan Gold” Mill

Note the mine office across from me. I'll head over there soon.

A few years back, we found this huge abandoned gold mill out in Nevada. It is similar in size and scope to the Atlanta Mill (now destroyed) that we visited some time ago. This mill was abandoned decades ago and has sat idle since. Vandals have ransacked some of the place but a surprising amount of equipment is still left.
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J and J Cabin

Cabin with autumn colors.

In early autumn 2015, we hiked cross-country over a mountain to a seldom visited mine and cabin along a stream in central Nevada. It is a quiet and peaceful spot among the aspen trees.
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Senator Mine

Mine camp.

High on top of a mountain in central Nevada is the Senator quicksilver mine. The history of the mine is a little hard to follow as the property changed hands a few times and recorded owners and production are missing, but from what I can tell, the mine was first operated in 1925 and ran until WWII.
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Honeymoon Hill Petroglyphs

At the top of one hill is a isolated petroglyph site.

Last summer, we visited a pair of petroglyph sites out in central Nevada collectively called Honeymoon Hill. They are close together on nearby hills and have fantastic views of the areas they overlook, which is probably why people were here; hunting and keeping watch over the surrounding terrain.
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