Micah's Mine

Micah’s Mine

I couldn’t find any information about this little mine and it was a surprise when I came across it. We named it “Micah’s” Mine because of some fancy 4wd moves Micah did on his approach up the very steep road to the mine. He didn’t quite make it but he was the only one daring enough to try. After we got him back on terra firma, we all decided it might be safer to walk.

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Recent News

7/12/15: Updated the Silver Dyke Mine page with photos from a revisit in late 2014. Added quite a few more photos from inside and our visit to the upper camp.

Don’t forget to like my Facebook page: Starbuck’s Exploring. I occasional post photos there that don’t seem to make it to this site.

Silver Canyon

Silver Canyon Cabin

About a year ago, at the end of an exploring trip in the White Mountains of Eastern California, we decided to take a side trip to a little cabin I had heard about. From what little history I could find on the place, there didn’t seem to be any mining activity in the area to justify a cabin at this location, so I was curious why it was there.

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Moreno Maze pictograph

Moreno Maze pictograph

Western Riverside County has a handful of unique Native American rock art maze drawings. The most well-known of them is the Hemet Maze. It is a petroglyph of complex design carved directly into granite. There are however other lesser known rock art mazes and one of them is the Moreno Maze pictograph. The meaning behind these mazes is vigorously debated among rock art researchers but it remains a mystery.
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Sandstone Cabin

“Sandstone” Cabin

We stumbled across this remote cabin back in 2010. Like so many cabins I come across, I haven’t been able to find the history on this one. I call it the “Sandstone” cabin because there is a bit of sandstone in the area, which is quite unusual. There are a few minor silver prospects nearby and I suspect this cabin was built to support one of them.

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Nelson Range Cabin

Lee Hilton, DVNP

Also known as Macey’s Cabin and the Nelson Cabin, it was built for the Cerrussite Mine which it sits next to. It is a cozy little spot we’ve been visiting since 1999.

J. F. Wasson staked a claim on the site in February 25, 1954.  The cabin probably dates from around then and has been improved a number of times over the years. The mining claim was quitclaimed by Sam Wasson to Jim Macey on May 5, 1986. He worked it occasionally until the California Desert Protection Act expanded the boundaries of Death Valley National Park in 1994. (And consequently made Death Valley the largest national park in the lower 48 states.) Since then, it has been available on a first-come, first served basis. Please treat it with respect and keep it clean. A risk of Hantavirus exists in old cabins like this.
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MV Mill

MV Mill

I found this hidden mill a few years ago. It is unusual in that it was powered by a Pelton wheel. Water was funneled into a ditch and then a pipe and poured over the waterwheel, which drove the equipment inside. A water powered mill is a rare sight in the land of little rain.
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